Back Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick

1928–1982
Philip K. Dick, May 1977. (Philippe HUPP/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

Major works:
The Man in the High CastleMartian Time-SlipThe Three Stigmata of Palmer EldritchDo Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?UbikFlow My Tears, the Policeman SaidA Scanner DarklyVALIS

Excerpt from

Ubik

Philip K. Dick

Now he became aware of an insidious, seeping, cooling-off which at some earlier and unremembered time had begun to explore him—investigating him as well as the world around him. It reminded him of their final moments on Luna. The chill debased the surfaces of objects; it warped, expanded, showed itself as bulblike swellings that sighed audibly and popped. Into the manifold open wounds the cold drifted, all the way down into the heart of things, the core which made them live. What he saw now seemed to be a desert of ice from which stark boulders jutted. A wind spewed across the plain which reality had become; the wind congealed into deeper ice, and the boulders disappeared for the most part. And darkness presented itself off at the edges of his vision; he caught only a meager glimpse of it.
But, he thought, this is projection on my part. It isn’t the universe which is being entombed by layers of wind, cold, darkness and ice; all this is going on within me, and yet I seem to see it outside. Strange, he thought. Is the whole world inside me? Engulfed by my body? When did that happen? It must be a manifestation of dying, he said to himself. The uncertainty which I feel, the slowing down into entropy—that’s the process, and the ice which I see is the result of the success of the process. When I blink out, he thought, the whole universe will disappear.

Read a passage from Ubik by Philip K. Dick
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